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Book Review Coaching Leadership

The Advice Trap

Michael Bungay Stanier gives us The Advice Trap, a guide to understanding your default advice giving behaviours, and a range of techniques to tame them. Instead, he suggests you stay curious for longer, and Michael shows you why that’s important.

It’s another short and punchy book, very much in the mould of The Coaching Habit. It’s not quite a sequel, but it certainly builds on the ideas of the previous book and you might take more from The Advice Trap if it’s not the first MBS book you pick-up.

It’s very much positioned towards leaders rather than pure coaches, and it encourages you towards behaviours that allow your leadership to become more coach-like.

We start with a whistle-stop tour of why giving advice is not a great default position, and how it kills off the Drive of the people you are giving advice to. Next up, we learn a bit about Easy vs Hard change, and how giving less advice is certainly in the “Hard change” bucket.

You get to explore whether you are a Tell-It, Save-It or Control-It type person, although you will probably recognise a bit of all of them in you. I certainly did!

We look at a ways to deflect each of these behaviours to become more coach-like, and also get to see the pain of each type of advice monster. Tell-It means you jump in too early and give answers to the first problem, not the biggest one, Control-It means you avoid risk, so don’t explore new and different ideas, and so on.

You get a whirlwind summary of the Coaching Habit, either as a great summary or enough context to catch-up up if you’ve not read it.

The practical advice continues, digging into a lot of Foggifiers, the tactics and pitfalls that people deploy to get away from the hard work of coaching and bringing about change. You’ll recognise all these behaviours, whether it’s deflecting to other people rather than working on what you can control, or going so big picture you can’t find something that’s actually available to be changed.

We also bring in the TERA quotient, Tribe, Expectation, Rank and Autonomy. By lifting these up, you gain more engagement, and are more likely to then get to great outcomes and big change.

The rest of the book is really about practising and cementing these skills, everything from being generous to finding ways to drop in even more of the coach-like behaviours.

There’s also a bonus chapter of advice on when it’s good to use advice! As leaders we need to know when it’s right to use a range of techniques, and whilst advice is likely to be an overused tool, it’s no good going so far the other way that you never use it.

This is another great book for leaders who want to strengthen their coaching muscles. It’s a quick read that you can dip back into whenever you need to, and the exercises and self-reflection tasks are really powerful ways to take even more from it!

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Coaching Leadership

Exponential Starts Slow

When you are looking for any sort of compounding growth, it’s really important to remember that it starts off really slowly. If you look at any curve, you see that most of the growth occurs at the end of the interval.

That’s why you need to take the motivational posts about small efforts with a big pinch of salt. Growing by 1% every day for year does indeed get you to 37x from where you started, but getting to double will take you 70 days, rather than the 10 you’d expect if it was growing in a straight line.

So, you start off slow. It feels hard, and it doesn’t feel like you are making much progress. That’s why I like to think about the Flywheel in this early phase.

When you know the early efforts will be hard, it’s easier to keep pushing. Build up that momentum with an early shove, then you can maintain and grow over time with the same push.

If you don’t immediately see 10x growth, then don’t be disheartened. Look for the positive progress and hold on to the those incremental gains. See it getting easier, and the process of change becoming a habit. Do that, and you’ll get over the slow start, and the growth will come.

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Coaching Leadership

You Don’t Have One Problem Anymore

When you only have one problem, it’s almost certainly got an approachable solution. It might not be easy, and it might take a while to get there, but you will likely be able to see a path to get to where you need to be.

This can often be the state of play when you are working at the level of a single team. You have one big overriding problem to deal with at a time, you figure it out, then you solve it.

As you take on more responsibility, the chances that you are dealing with just a single problem become vanishingly small. Working across a group of teams, you quickly find that each team has their own problems, whether that’s product, project or people issues. There’s also things going on in the wider world, across the organisation and even inside your own department.

Now you need to work with different strategies. These problems are going to be linked to one another, so working on one could make another worse. You won’t be able to solve them all, so you need to figure out where to put your focus. Things will change, so you need to be ready to adapt to what’s coming.

  • Understand – Look at everything that’s a problem right now. Figure out the Important or Urgent ones, delegate or ignore the rest.
  • Relate – Put together problems that are related. If working on one impacts another then you need to understand that relationship.
  • Communicate – If people feel their problems are being ignored, then they will feel that those problems are unsurmountable. Let them know where the focus is, and why.

Keep going through this process on a regular basis. You’ll solve a few problems, some will get more important and need more focus. Some might just go away!

There’s a lot more that you need to do when working at the higher level. You don’t just have a single big problem any more, and you need to recognise that to succeed.

Categories
Coaching Leadership

Impact!

There are a number of times in your life where it’s really important to get across the impact of what you have done, in a way that’s really easy for others to understand.

In the corporate world, there’s a few key points where you want to get this right. It’s on your CV, it’s during annual reviews and it’s when you are preparing a promotion pack or for an internal move.

Many people will make one of two key mistakes. They’ll either focus too heavily on what they did, going too deep into their responsibilities. Other times they will make their impact really opaque, something that makes sense to them, but is really dense to any external reader.

You need to fight both of these, and really highlight the Impact!

There’s a really simple trick to beat these problems, and make sure that you stand out from the crowd. You just need to look over any statement you make, pretend you are someone who doesn’t have great context over your work, and ask “So What?”.

“I upgraded all our systems from v1 to v2”. – So What?

“By upgrading all of our systems, I reduced page loading times by 50%, increasing conversion by 5% and driving an additional £1 million in annual revenue”. – Wow!

It can be tough to get into this habit, so there’s a couple of tips you can use to help:

  1. Read your statements out loud. It helps you to see that they flow, and if they feel simple to understand
  2. Pretend to be someone else. Read the statements as if it was your CEO. If it doesn’t make sense, get rid of some jargon and go again
  3. Actually get someone else to read the docs. If they don’t understand the impact, edit until they do.

This technique will get you noticed. Practicing this skill will make it easier.

Show off your Impact, and people will understand why you are the right person for the opportunity.