Categories
Book Review Coaching Leadership

Top Posts of 2021

We all get a bit reflective at this time of year, so I’m looking back at my most visited posts over 2021.

  1. Radical Candor
  2. Coaching Tools – Model T
  3. The Coaching Spectrum
  4. Coaching Tools – Scaling
  5. When?
  6. Elevator Pitches
  7. The Advice Trap
  8. Slow is Smooth
  9. I’ll Know It When I See It
  10. Coaching For Performance

It’s another year where book reviews have done well, people are especially keen to keep learning about Radical Candor! Check out my full list of reviews for more, and watch out for some fresh writeups in the New Year.

It’s great to see how many people are honing their craft with my series on Coaching Tools. Given how popular they have been, I’ll certainly be continuing with these, let me know if there’s anything that you like me to cover.

Finally, it’s great to see a few of my more recent posts breaking into the top 10. This is all down to the growth in readership over the last couple of years, so thank you so much for joining me on this journey. If you are new this year, then dive into the archives so you don’t miss out!

Categories
Book Review Coaching Leadership

Radical Candor

Radical Candor is Kim Scott’s approach to becoming a great leader by empowering your team.

It’s a simple exhortation, encourage people to greatness by Caring Personally and Challenging Directly. As with most simple things, it’s not necessarily easy to achieve.

The book is generally well structured, covering the philosophy first, breaking it down into what ‘Caring Personally’ and ‘Challenging Directly’ mean, and what happens when you miss on one or both of the axes (Ruinous Empathy, Manipulative Insincerity and Obnoxious Aggression).

It’s only a hundred or so pages for this first section, but that is pretty small print, so do beware when pacing your reading!

The second section is built around techniques, from how to elicit feedback and build that culture of sharing, to how to host and structure great meetings. It covers building trust, working in teams and how to inspire growth in all types of team members.

There will be sections that resonate more or less deeply with you, depending on what the culture of your organisation is, where your experience and preferences lie, and the current realm of influence you have available to you.

For me, some of the ideas about the purposes of meetings, how to structure them and where they fall on the Listen / Decide / Execute cycle were very useful, especially around being explicit when you are moving between the Debate and Decision phases.

Even if all you take from this book is that it’s important to think about what motivates your people, how you can help them grow and how you can make them happier and more engaged, then it will have been worth reading.

If you can open yourself up to understanding and valuing the difference in others, then that truly gives you a chance to be a great and motivational leader.